Ultramarine

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Ultramarine color was used as wall paint since its production was widespread and inexpensive. It was a durable choice for exterior walls.

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Ultramarine
Ultramarine Color

Ultramarine is a color that is evocative of the sea. A blend of blue and violet, ultramarine is relaxing and may be one of the most restful shades you can lay eyes upon. Ultramarine is also a deep color used in the Catholic Church to symbolize purity. 


Although it is an uncommon choice for an interior, ultramarine makes for a beautiful accent wall or piece of furniture.


This is one of the best quality pigments available for watercolor painting. The pigment is one of the most versatile and transparent available. 


It can be used not only in many forms such as watercolor paint, oil paint, acrylic paint and Gouache but also as body color for artists who use watercolor pencils or crayons.

Ultramarine color in branding

Ultramarine is a shade of blue that has been used in color branding as far back as the 1500’s. The color is associated with strength and depth. 


It originated from the stone Lapis Lazuli– a beautiful blue mineral originally found only in Afghanistan. 


It is an excellent choice for branding whether you are trying to show your customers how menial and worry-free the world can look if you use your product or service, or whether you want to send the message that you are a dependable brand that makes calm, collected decisions.

Ultramarine color in product design

This color is considered one of the classic colors in product design. Blue-green and blue hues can be found in flags, tableware, textiles and other products we use every day. 


Ultramarine color has been around for thousands of years and has a deep cultural impact throughout history. 


It’s a color that creates an instant perception that most people would view as positive and steady.


When used in product design, it should be used sparingly: it can over power the product and become harsh on the eye. 


This makes it a suitable choice for a feature focal point (instead of background) or for creating contrast between the main product and its surroundings. 


This is a difficult color to work with as it adds weight and saturation that can sometimes clash with color schemes.

Ultramarine color in advertising


It has several positive characteristics which in some cases can be best to others. 


This color has unusual brightness and vividness. 


Why? 


Because it contains a lot of blue that correlates with the sky, sea, spring, and water. In addition, ultramarine resembles silver and white light.


In Japanese, ultramarine is called “Meikyo’iro” which means beautiful blue and it was often seen as blue sky color and the royal color in Japan until the middle 19th century. 


Even when Catherine de Medici brought use of ultramarine from Italy to France, it was still expensive and largely out of sight for most people.


It is primarily found in nature, such as the color of the ocean or the deep blue sky. 


You will also find it used as a stand alone color with no contrast. Blue has long been associated with men and has been claimed to be a trigger for male response.

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